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CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Samples of Earth rocks and real meteorites are featured in an interactive display at the new Great Balls of Fire exhibit at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. The grand opening featured remarks by former NASA astronaut Tom Jones, and Therrin Protze, chief operating officer at Delaware North Parks and Resorts at the visitor complex. Great Balls of Fire shares the story of the origins of our solar system, asteroids and comets and their possible impacts and risks. The 1,500-square-foot exhibit, located in the East Gallery of the IMAX theatre at the visitor complex, features several interactive displays, real meteorites and replica asteroid models. The exhibit is a production of The Space Science Institute’s National Center for Interactive Learning. It is a traveling exhibition that also receives funding from NASA and the National Science Foundation. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

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CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Former NASA astronaut Tom Jones discusses the characteristics of asteroids and meteors with a young guest during the grand opening of the Great Balls of Fire exhibit at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Great Balls of Fire shares the story of the origins of our solar system, asteroids and comets and their possible impacts and risks. The 1,500-square-foot exhibit, located in the East Gallery of the IMAX theatre at the visitor complex, features several interactive displays, real meteorites and replica asteroid models. The exhibit is a production of The Space Science Institute’s National Center for Interactive Learning. It is a traveling exhibition that also receives funding from NASA and the National Science Foundation. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

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CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Lights flickered and balloons fell as former NASA astronaut Tom Jones, left, and Therrin Protze, chief operating officer of Delaware North Parks and Resorts at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida, welcomed guests to the grand opening of the Great Balls of Fire exhibit at the visitor complex. Great Balls of Fire shares the story of the origins of our solar system, asteroids and comets and their possible impacts and risks. The 1,500-square-foot exhibit, located in the East Gallery of the IMAX theatre at the visitor complex, features several interactive displays, real meteorites and replica asteroid models. The exhibit is a production of The Space Science Institute’s National Center for Interactive Learning. It is a traveling exhibition that also receives funding from NASA and the National Science Foundation. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

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CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Former NASA astronaut Tom Jones, left, presses the button on a simulated model of an asteroid to mark the grand opening of the new Great Balls of Fire exhibit at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. To his right is Therrin Protze, chief operating officer with Delaware North Parks and Resorts at the visitor complex. Great Balls of Fire shares the story of the origins of our solar system, asteroids and comets and their possible impacts and risks. The 1,500-square-foot exhibit, located in the East Gallery of the IMAX theatre at the visitor complex, features several interactive displays, real meteorites and replica asteroid models. The exhibit is a production of The Space Science Institute’s National Center for Interactive Learning. It is a traveling exhibition that also receives funding from NASA and the National Science Foundation. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

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CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Therrin Protze, chief operating officer with Delaware North Parks and Resorts at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida, welcomes guests to the grand opening of the Great Balls of Fire exhibit. Great Balls of Fire shares the story of the origins of our solar system, asteroids and comets and their possible impacts and risks. The 1,500-square-foot exhibit, located in the East Gallery of the IMAX theatre at the visitor complex, features several interactive displays, real meteorites and replica asteroid models. The exhibit is a production of The Space Science Institute’s National Center for Interactive Learning. It is a traveling exhibition that also receives funding from NASA and the National Science Foundation. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

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CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Former NASA astronaut Tom Jones, left, joins Andrea Farmer, senior public relations manager with Delaware North Parks and Resorts at NASA Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida, for the grand opening of the Great Balls of Fire exhibit. Great Balls of Fire shares the story of the origins of our solar system, asteroids and comets and their possible impacts and risks. The 1,500-square-foot exhibit, located in the East Gallery of the IMAX theatre at the visitor complex, features several interactive displays, real meteorites and replica asteroid models. The exhibit is a production of The Space Science Institute’s National Center for Interactive Learning. It is a traveling exhibition that also receives funding from NASA and the National Science Foundation. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

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CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The grand opening of the new Great Balls of Fire exhibit was held at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. The grand opening featured remarks by former NASA astronaut Tom Jones, and Therrin Protze, chief operating officer at Delaware North Parks and Resorts at the visitor complex. Great Balls of Fire shares the story of the origins of our solar system, asteroids and comets and their possible impacts and risks. The 1,500-square-foot exhibit, located in the East Gallery of the IMAX theatre at the visitor complex, features several interactive displays, real meteorites and replica asteroid models. The exhibit is a production of The Space Science Institute’s National Center for Interactive Learning. It is a traveling exhibition that also receives funding from NASA and the National Science Foundation. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

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CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Former NASA astronaut Tom Jones, left, joins Andrea Farmer, senior public relations manager, and Therrin Protze, chief operating officer, both with Delaware North Parks and Resorts at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida, for the grand opening of the Great Balls of Fire exhibit. Great Balls of Fire shares the story of the origins of our solar system, asteroids and comets and their possible impacts and risks. The 1,500-square-foot exhibit, located in the East Gallery of the IMAX theatre at the visitor complex, features several interactive displays, real meteorites and replica asteroid models. The exhibit is a production of The Space Science Institute’s National Center for Interactive Learning. It is a traveling exhibition that also receives funding from NASA and the National Science Foundation. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

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CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Former NASA astronaut Tom Jones discusses the characteristics of asteroids and meteors with a young guest during the grand opening of the Great Balls of Fire exhibit at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Great Balls of Fire shares the story of the origins of our solar system, asteroids and comets and their possible impacts and risks. The 1,500-square-foot exhibit, located in the East Gallery of the IMAX theatre at the visitor complex, features several interactive displays, real meteorites and replica asteroid models. The exhibit is a production of The Space Science Institute’s National Center for Interactive Learning. It is a traveling exhibition that also receives funding from NASA and the National Science Foundation. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

Hale Bopp comet photographed from the orbiter Columbia

STS083-410-008 (4-8 April 1997) — A 35mm camera was used to record this time-exposed image of Comet Hale-Bopp at sunset. Note that stars show up in this image because of the more lengthy exposure time, whereas the celestial features do not show in the majority of Space Shuttle pictures focused on Earth and its horizon. As another spin-off of the more lengthy time exposure, city lights and petroleum fires are seen as distorted streaks.