Wild 2 Features

These images taken by NASA’s Stardust spacecraft highlight the diverse features that make up the surface of comet Wild 2, showing a variety of small pinnacles and mesas seen on the limb of the comet and the location of a 2-kilometer (1.2-mile) series of aligned scarps, or cliffs, that are best seen in the stereo images. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06284

Astronaut George Nelson working on Comet Halley Active monitoring program

61C-05-026 (14 Jan. 1986) — Astronaut George D. Nelson smiles for a fellow crew man’s 35mm camera exposure while participating in the Comet Halley active monitoring program (CHAMP). Camera equipment and a protective shroud used to eliminate all cabin light interference surround the mission specialist. This is the first of three 1986 missions which are scheduled to monitor the rare visit by the comet. The principal investigators for CHAMP are S. Alan Stern of the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado; and Dr. Stephen Mende of Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory.

Mars Comet Encounter Briefing

Jim Green, director, Planetary Science Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington gives remarks during a media briefing where he and other panelists outlined how space and Earth-based assets will be used to image and study comet Siding Spring during its Sunday, Oct. 19 flyby of Mars, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2014 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

Mars Comet Encounter Briefing

Carey Lisse, senior astrophysicist, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland gives remarks during a media briefing where he and other panelists outlined how space and Earth-based assets will be used to image and study comet Siding Spring during its Sunday, Oct. 19 flyby of Mars, Thursday, Oct. 9, 2014 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

Swarm of Comets Artist Concept

This illustration shows a star behind a shattered comet. Observations of the star KIC 8462852 by NASA’s Kepler and Spitzer space telescopes suggest that its unusual light signals are likely from dusty comet fragments, which blocked the light of the star as they passed in front of it in 2011 and 2013. The comets are thought to be traveling around the star in a very long, eccentric orbit. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20053